Creative Discovery Fellows Program

Creative Discovery Fellows Program pages

Asian American & Asian Diaspora Studies 121: History of the Chinese in the U.S.

This course covers the entire history of the Chinese in the U.S., from the Gold Rush period in the mid-l9th century to the present. Since Chinese immigration and exclusion are two continuous processes throughout this history, both will be the focus of the course. The two processes and their interaction with each other also generated considerable political, economic, and cultural dynamism in the settlement and development of the Chinese American community throughout the U.S. Adding to the complexity of the two processes and the community dynamics has been the continuous impact of the...

Harvey Dong

Harvey Dong teaches Ethnic Studies courses as a lecturer in Ethnic Studies and Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies at UC Berkeley. Initially, Dr. Dong took part in the 1969 Third World Liberation Front, a student movement to establish Ethnic Studies. Once Ethnic Studies was established, Dr. Dong taught some of the department’s first communities issues courses based on extensive fieldwork carried out in San Francisco Manilatown and Chinatown, while also active in struggles to save the International Hotel in Manilatown and to protect Asian immigrant labor rights. Dr. Dong...

Anibel Ferus-Comelo

Anibel Ferus-Comelo draws upon over 20 years of community-engaged research and teaching to her joint appointment at the Center for Labor Research and Education and the Goldman School of Public Policy. She directs the Labor Studies program at UC Berkeley through courses, internships, and collaborative research initiatives with labor and community partners. Anibel holds an M.A. in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Economic Geography.

Public Policy 160AC: Work, Justice and the Labor Movement

This course provides a broad, interdisciplinary overview of the U.S. labor movement in the fight for social and economic justice. It will introduce students to critiques of racial capitalism and the power dynamics inherent in paid work while considering why and how workers form unions in response. One of the primary objectives of this course is to develop a theoretical and analytical understanding of contemporary workers’ experiences of work in the U.S. shaped by race, class, gender, sexuality, immigration status, language, religion, and other social constructs. There will be a special...

Seth Lunine

Seth Lunine is extensively involved with the American Cultures Engaged Scholarship (ACES) Program and explores issues of power, race, and class in the contemporary city in his course: Geography X50AC: “California.” This course explores the complex history of California and dives into the darker histories of racism and oppression. Originally developed as part of the American Cultures...

Geography X50AC: “California”

About the Course Assignment

California is a broad, introductory course that explores the material places and social spaces that create both astonishing wealth and intractable inequality in California.Created by Dr. Seth Lunine and Chancellor’s Public Fellow Sophia Fenn, the American Cultures Engaged Scholarship (ACES) / Creative Discovery component of the course enabled Fall Program for Freshmen students to extend and contextualize topics related to gentrification and the Bay Region housing crisis....

Faculty Spotlights

Each year, approximately 10 faculty from a wide variety of disciplines are selected to participate in the Creative Discovery Fellows program. Faculty participate in a year-long developmental program that includes a 3-day Institute, monthly cohort meetings, and various workshops, as well as individual consultations with media and pedagogy experts. During implementation, their students also receive support in the form of workshops, in-class demonstrations, individual consultations, group feedback, online resources, and tutorials.

Instructor Impacts

[The CDF program] is very valuable. We tend to do the same old stuff in our classes—exam, paper, exam, paper, repeat. This only taps into certain sets of skills. While these assignments develop valuable academic skills, students often have much more they can bring to their class experience. For a certain type of student (and teacher!) who feel constrained by the limits of traditional assignments and classroom protocols, the [Creative Discovery Fellows] program is quite freeing in providing institutional support for trying something new.

As the above instructor outlined, the...

Ethnic Studies 176, 'Against the Grain: Ethnic American Art and Artists'

Ethnic Studies 176 approaches coursework from various critical/theoretical perspectives, often constructing them as we analyze, and through the lens of Ethnic Studies. It assumes that few, if any of you, are entering the course with an extensive background in the art and cultural production or the attendant scholarly criticism of American ethnic art. It does, however, assume the ability and willingness to read and analyze works closely. Over the course of the semester, the course has various Ethnic American artists from the Bay Area who will share and discuss...

Comp Lit 60AC: "(Re)Making American History"

About the Course Assignment

Since Spring 2019, Dr. Palau has taught and continues to teach Comparative Literature 60AC: “(Re)making American History,” a course that explores Post-Civil Rights (re)makings of American History by studying works by writers and artists who participate in the urgent project of producing alternative and corrective visions of the United States’ past. The creative project in this course asks students to experiment actively with (re)making history themselves by selecting a course material that would serve as a starting...