Creative Discovery Fellows Program

Creative Discovery Fellows Program pages

Karina Palau

Dr. Karina Palau is a Continuing Lecturer in the Department of Comparative Literature. Her recent course offerings include a freshman writing seminar on travel literature, "Boroughs & Barrios: Moving in and through NYC and LA," an American Cultures course on (re)making American history in the post-Civil-Rights-Era U.S., and a course that examines depictions of four distinctive cities on the American continent: New York, Buenos Aires, Los Angeles, and Mexico City.

Since Spring 2019, Dr. Palau has taught and continues to teach...

Ronit Stahl

As a historian of modern America, Professor Stahl focuses on pluralism in American society by examining how politics, law, and religion interact in spaces such as the military and medicine. Her book, Enlisting Faith: How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America (Harvard University Press, 2017), traces the uneven processes through which the military struggled with, encouraged, and regulated religious pluralism over the twentieth century. Just as the...

Gregory Choy

Dr. Gregory Choy joined UC Berkeley's Department of Ethnic Studies in 2004, where he has served as an instructor in Comparative Ethnic Studies and Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies. Since that time, Dr. Choy has taught courses on Asian American Literature, Art, and Ethnic Movements, especially from a cross-section of the art and cultural production within American ethnic-specific and interethnic contexts. He received his Ph.D. in English from the University of Washington and wrote his dissertation on Asian American...

English 135AC: "Race, Class & Disability: An American Foundling Museum"

About the Course Assignment

English 135AC: “Race, Class, & Disability: An American Foundling Museum” analyzed race, ethnicity, and disability in American cultures, focusing particularly on histories of family separation. A final project for the course asked students to curate an artifact for an “American Foundling Museum," with an opportunity to work in a variety of different mediums: conventional papers, podcasts, video, graphic art, and more. Across the semester, students applied writing and arts-based practices to generate a major...

Susan Schweik

Susan Schweik is a researching professor who brings in her interest in Twentieth-Century Poetry, late Nineteenth-Century American Literature, Women's Studies and Gender Theory, Urban Studies, war literature and children's literature into her Creative Discovery Fellows course, English 135AC, Race, Class,...

ACES Student Projects

About

The American Cultures Engaged Scholarship (ACES) Program offers students and faculty the opportunity to work with community organizations to develop cutting edge research projects associated with some of the nation's most pressing social issues.

The following are a collection of our growing ACES course offerings and previous student projects from these community-learning classes.

Patricia Steenland

In College Writing (CW) R4B: “Images of History”, Dr. Patricia Steenland brought awareness and visibility to the Japanese American internment, an event that is often brushed over in history classes or lost in the context of World War II. Students in this course engaged in projects that sought to make it clear that there were over 500 UC Berkeley students who were forcibly removed from campus and displaced at Japanese Internment camps, which prevented them from finishing their...

Khalid Kadir

Khalid Kadir’s course Engineering 157AC / International Area Studies (IAS) 157AC, Engineering, Environment, and Society forefronts socio-political concerns by engaging students in environmental justice, social justice, and engineering issues, which have been decentered in favor of the technical aspects of environmental engineering. Originally developed as part...

Kenneth Worthy

Kenneth Worthy is a researching lecturer with interests in human-environment relationships over history and across cultures that help to better understand the origins of modernity's global environmental crisis, with the goal of a healthier, more sustainable, and livable world. He uses interdisciplinary elements in his course ESPM 50AC: “Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management” to explore how the health of the...

International and Area Studies/Engineering 157AC: “Engineering, Environment, and Society”

About the Course Assignment

IAS/E 157AC: “Engineering, Environment, and Society” forefronts the political and social concerns that are of decentered in favor of the technical aspects of environmental engineering. Originally developed as part of the American Cultures Engaged Scholarship (ACES) program, the project developed for IAS/E 157AC allowed for students to explore alternative ways of centering the knowledge produced in the communities...