Creative Discovery Faculty Spotlight

Harvey Dong

Harvey Dong teaches Ethnic Studies courses as a lecturer in Ethnic Studies and Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies at UC Berkeley. Initially, Dr. Dong took part in the 1969 Third World Liberation Front, a student movement to establish Ethnic Studies. Once Ethnic Studies was established, Dr. Dong taught some of the department’s first communities issues courses based on extensive fieldwork carried out in San Francisco Manilatown and Chinatown, while also active in struggles to save the International Hotel in Manilatown and to protect Asian immigrant labor rights. Dr. Dong...

Anibel Ferus-Comelo

Anibel Ferus-Comelo draws upon over 20 years of community-engaged research and teaching to her joint appointment at the Center for Labor Research and Education and the Goldman School of Public Policy. She directs the Labor Studies program at UC Berkeley through courses, internships, and collaborative research initiatives with labor and community partners. Anibel holds an M.A. in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Economic Geography.

Seth Lunine

Seth Lunine is extensively involved with the American Cultures Engaged Scholarship (ACES) Program and explores issues of power, race, and class in the contemporary city in his course: Geography X50AC: “California.” This course explores the complex history of California and dives into the darker histories of racism and oppression. Originally developed as part of the American Cultures...

Karina Palau

Dr. Karina Palau is a Continuing Lecturer in the Department of Comparative Literature. Her recent course offerings include a freshman writing seminar on travel literature, "Boroughs & Barrios: Moving in and through NYC and LA," an American Cultures course on (re)making American history in the post-Civil-Rights-Era U.S., and a course that examines depictions of four distinctive cities on the American continent: New York, Buenos Aires, Los Angeles, and Mexico City.

Since Spring 2019, Dr. Palau has taught and continues to teach...

Ronit Stahl

As a historian of modern America, Professor Stahl focuses on pluralism in American society by examining how politics, law, and religion interact in spaces such as the military and medicine. Her book, Enlisting Faith: How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America (Harvard University Press, 2017), traces the uneven processes through which the military struggled with, encouraged, and regulated religious pluralism over the twentieth century. Just as the...

Gregory Choy

Dr. Gregory Choy joined UC Berkeley's Department of Ethnic Studies in 2004, where he has served as an instructor in Comparative Ethnic Studies and Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies. Since that time, Dr. Choy has taught courses on Asian American Literature, Art, and Ethnic Movements, especially from a cross-section of the art and cultural production within American ethnic-specific and interethnic contexts. He received his Ph.D. in English from the University of Washington and wrote his dissertation on Asian American...

Susan Schweik

Susan Schweik is a researching professor who brings in her interest in Twentieth-Century Poetry, late Nineteenth-Century American Literature, Women's Studies and Gender Theory, Urban Studies, war literature and children's literature into her Creative Discovery Fellows course, English 135AC, Race, Class,...

Patricia Steenland

In College Writing (CW) R4B: “Images of History”, Dr. Patricia Steenland brought awareness and visibility to the Japanese American internment, an event that is often brushed over in history classes or lost in the context of World War II. Students in this course engaged in projects that sought to make it clear that there were over 500 UC Berkeley students who were forcibly removed from campus and displaced at Japanese Internment camps, which prevented them from finishing their...

Khalid Kadir

Khalid Kadir’s course Engineering 157AC / International Area Studies (IAS) 157AC, Engineering, Environment, and Society forefronts socio-political concerns by engaging students in environmental justice, social justice, and engineering issues, which have been decentered in favor of the technical aspects of environmental engineering. Originally developed as part...

Kenneth Worthy

Kenneth Worthy is a researching lecturer with interests in human-environment relationships over history and across cultures that help to better understand the origins of modernity's global environmental crisis, with the goal of a healthier, more sustainable, and livable world. He uses interdisciplinary elements in his course ESPM 50AC: “Introduction to Culture and Natural Resource Management” to explore how the health of the...